(Source: leonkarssen, via leonkarssen)

nprhereandnow:

I will not be picking up any hitchhikers. Not after seeing this sign, anyway. #Oklahoma

nprhereandnow:

I will not be picking up any hitchhikers. Not after seeing this sign, anyway. #Oklahoma

mattressblowoutsale:

kimkanyekimye:

Kanye West speaking to a class at the Los Angeles Trade Tech College 9/19/14

Kanye west is always dressing/standing like how I feel all the time

mattressblowoutsale:

kimkanyekimye:

Kanye West speaking to a class at the Los Angeles Trade Tech College 9/19/14

Kanye west is always dressing/standing like how I feel all the time

(via ruinedchildhood)

ancientart:

Depictions of the Abu Simbel temples, from 1843 to present.

Of the most magnificent monuments in the world, the two temples at Abu Simbel date to about 1260 BCE, and have long captured the interest and imaginations of many.

Ramesses II dedicated the so-called Small Temple of Abu Simbel to the goddess Hathor, and his wife Nefertari. Slightly further south is the larger temple, which Ramesses dedicated to the gods Ptah, Amun-Re, Re-Horakhty, as well as his own divine self. 4 colossal seated figures of Ramesses take up the facade of the latter.

The Great Temple of Ramesses II by kairoinfo4u.

Temple of Hathor/Nefertari, published in 1902, Internet Archive Book Images.

The Great Temple of Ramesses II, published in 1921, Internet Archive Book Images.

The Great Temple of Ramesses II, published in 1896Internet Archive Book Images.

'Interior of the excavated Temple of Abu Simbel in Nubia,' published in 1843, The British Library.

thegetty:

Banned Books Week—History Edition

This page was removed from the 13th-century Morgan Picture Bible. Why?

It was owned in the 1600s by Persian ruler Shah Abbas, who, it is suspected, did not approve of this story about a son’s defiance of his father.

This page shows the battle between the armies of traitoroous Absalom and his father King David, and Absalom’s death.

Zoom into the illumination: here.

Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom to read. This week we’re sharing examples of books from cultural history that have been attacked, vilified, or otherwise banned.

Scenes from the Life of Absalom, about 1250, French. J. Paul Getty Museum.

(Source: janskylar)

ancientart:

A quick look at: Greek votive offerings, with a particular focus on those of the Archaic period from Olympia.

Since we have received everything from the Gods, and it is right to pay the giver some tithe of his gifts, we pay such a tithe of possessions in votive offering, of bodies in gifts of (hair and) adornment, and of life in sacrifices.” -Sallustius in ‘On the Gods and the Cosmos,’ XVI (translation by Gilbert Murray).

A ‘votive offering’ is essentially a gift to a god. Once dedicated, the object is thought to become the “inalienable property of that god” (Whitley 2001). In theory, almost any kind of object could be used as a votive, we even have literary accounts which speak of captured ships being dedicated as a thank offering to a god (see Herodotus VIII.121).

Here I won’t be exploring the psychology of giving such offerings, however, it is likely that the motives were not quite so straightforward as suggested by the Latin phrase ‘do ut des' (I give that you may give). While the concept of reciprocity, a cycle of exchange between human and god, is of course relevant here, one must also not underestimate the value ancient Greek society placed on visibly showing one’s piety.

The shown Greek votive offerings are from Olympia, and consist largely of tiny animals made of bronze, stone, and clay. These objects date from the 10th century BCE, though those from the 8th century are the greatest in number. From the 9th century BCE, we can see a distinct increase in the range of votive offerings, and their quality.

When writing up this article, James Whitley’s book The Archaeology of Ancient Greece (Cambridge University Press, 2001) was of use, and is recommended for those interested Greek history. Photos taken by Richard.

missingozu:

Some more stills/info…
TEMPO // BASHO explores the possibility of an alternative modernity in the films of Yasujiro Ozu. Made in partnership with the Criterion Collection. *Screening tonight at the IFC Center (Sept 22, 8pm).
:: kogonada | USA, 2014 | Japanese | 13min. | Color and Black & White

oh fun an ozu film and i just learn about it now

missingozu:

Some more stills/info…

TEMPO // BASHO explores the possibility of an alternative modernity in the films of Yasujiro Ozu. Made in partnership with the Criterion Collection. *Screening tonight at the IFC Center (Sept 22, 8pm).

:: kogonada | USA, 2014 | Japanese | 13min. | Color and Black & White

oh fun an ozu film and i just learn about it now

(via truthandmovies)